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Cutting Faults
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Cutting Faults
Cutting Faults

Cutting faults in authentic diamonds are not a very common sight, but they do occur and are particularly common in round diamonds, chiefly the sloping of the table surface when it does not lie perfectly flat in relation to the girdle. In round diamonds the culet is susceptible to chipping off and the facets can easily be misaligned to reflect light poorly. Generally a wide girdle is safer for the stones durability, as thin girdle lines can become as vulnerable as the culet point. Also this is the area in which faulty cutting is most common, as the girdle may turn out too rough, too razor-sharp or out-of-round. Stone cutters are usually careful balancing this relative thickness of the girdle because a wide girdle makes the diamond appear smaller and a thinner one will chip against the setting hooks. There are five grade levels for the width of the girdle- extremely thin, thin, medium thinness, slight thickness and extreme thickness. There are several typical cutting faults for ‘fancy' shapes, referring to any shape other than round, but evaluating these kinds is a far more complicated task than with that of the round stones.

 

Remember that however hard diamonds may be, they are also susceptible to brittleness and poor or faulty cutting will make a stone prone to breaking. The culet is the most obvious vulnerable point, as it is easily chipped off and will most certainly break if not properly mounted inside it's casing. Today the culet is often missing in the stone and the point in filed down to a tiny flat surface.

 

 

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