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Cutting Techniques
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Cutting Techniques
Cutting Techniques

Understanding the various cutting techniques can also be helpful in avoiding the unfortunate experience of buying a fake diamond. The usual materials used in making imitation diamonds are Fabulite [Strontium titanate or a “ Wellington diamond”], GGG [Gadolinium gallium garnet], Zircon [CZ], YAG [Yttrium aluminum garnet] and glass . These are all wonderful materials to fool the eye, as they can be made to sparkle beautifully. But they are also both vulnerably brittle and prone to chipping, or they're too soft and therefore easily scratched and worn. The edges of any stone are the most vulnerable, so this is one of the first things you should check, and then look at the facets surfaces for scratch marks. Zircon is brittle and so will always show chipping at the edge of its facets after the first year. Fabulite will have a steady blue fluorescence and it will sparkle with an artificial glow. In all of these materials the edges will be too soft and rounded to seem authentic. There is nothing in this world that can truly imitate the sheer hardness and density of a real diamond, and the clean, sharp facet edges and girdle-line of an authentic stone.

 

Cubic Zirconia is the best material for fake diamond making today. It's relatively hard in comparison to the cheaper materials being used, and therefore that much more difficult to detect. It's produced in both colorless and fancy colors, and it's almost as brilliant in its sparkle as a real diamond. However, Cubic Zirconia is also atleast 75 percent heavier than a real diamond and since most jewelers have a scale in their stores, you can always ask that the stone be weighed, and judge between the weight and the table spread. If you have already bought a stone, and are suspicious of its authenticity, buy a carbide scriber from a jewelry supply store and attempt to scratch the surface of one of the bottom facets. A real diamond can be scratched only with another real diamond, while zircon will scratch immediately. If you really want to protect yourself from a bad purchase, spend some money on an electronic diamond tester . This is a pocket-size device that measures thermal conductivity and costs between 150$ to 200$, and properly used this can indicate whether or not the diamond you are examining is real.

 

The only material used to fabricate diamonds today, which is harder than cubic zircon is synthetic Moissanite ; a silicon carbide that is very durable and can be highly polished to look like a real diamond. Unlike zircon, this material is lighter than a real diamond and it doesn't imitate sparkle and fire like zircon does. It has a tell-tale appearance of almost tacky brilliance that will look foreign to anyone familiar with diamonds and it costs quite a lot to make, so it may not be a good purchase, even if you know it's not authentic.

 

The new invention today is synthetic, lab-produced diamonds. The only substance that will truly defy your every attempt to distinguish its authenticity is a synthetically made diamond from a laboratory. This is a very costly process, so there a very few synthetic diamonds around, and this isn't a great concern for the average purchaser. Even diamond testers will indicate that a synthetic diamond is real, because it has been created to simulate a real diamond's characteristics, both chemically and physically. It looks exactly like a real diamond and can be tested only in big gem labs.

 

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